Final Design

On June 13, 1782, the Congress turned to its Secretary Charles Thomson, and provided all material submitted by the first three committees.

Thomson used the eagle – this time specifying an American bald eagle – as the sole supporter on the shield.  The motto”E Pluribus Unum”, was taken from the first committee, and was on a scroll held in the eagle’s beak. Thomson explained that the motto “E pluribus unum” alludes to the union between the states and federal government, as symbolized by the shield on the eagle’s breast.

Thompson's Drawing for the final seal.

Thompson’s Drawing for the final seal.

On June 20, 1782, only 7 days after starting on the seal, Thomas presented it to congress and it was approved the same day.

The first brass die was cut soon after and on September 16, 1782, Thompson used it for the first time on an official document.

A document of the Continental Congress, signed by President of the Congress John Hanson and Secretary of Congress Charles Thomson, giving George Washington the authority to negotiate with Great Britain for the "exchange, subsistence, and better treatment of prisoners of war."

A document of the Continental Congress, signed by President of the Congress John Hanson and Secretary of Congress Charles Thomson, giving George Washington the authority to negotiate with Great Britain for the “exchange, subsistence, and better treatment of prisoners of war.” his was the first document impressed with the Great Seal of the United States

 

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